Excellent and welcoming and I look forward to continuing! It’s what I feel has been missing after my surgeries and all the doctor visits. Thank you!

“Just completed the Anticancer Lifestyle program. Strongly encourage survivors, those looking to prevent cancer, those with risk factors, and really all of us to take this course. Most of us are unaware of how many risks exist, particularly from environmental factors. My favorite was the environment section. People get some nutrition, stress management, and exercise guidance but virtually no information about toxins and their impact.”

“I love that this course provides participants with evidence-based information and concrete tools for living a happier and healthier life, even while coping with a cancer diagnosis.”

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Breast cancer and the environment: a review of the data

A review in the journal Environmental Health gives a detailed summary of the connection between breast cancer and the environment.

In this review, the researchers examine the continually expanding and increasingly compelling data linking radiation and various chemicals in our environment to the current high incidence of breast cancer.

“Singly and in combination, these toxicants may have contributed significantly to the increasing rates of breast cancer observed over the past several decades. Exposures early in development from gestation through adolescence and early adulthood are particularly of concern as they re-shape the program of genetic, epigenetic and physiological processes in the developing mammary system, leading to an increased risk for developing breast cancer. In the 8 years since we last published a comprehensive review of the relevant literature, hundreds of new papers have appeared supporting this link, and in this update, the evidence on this topic is more extensive and of better quality than that previously available.

“Increasing evidence from epidemiological studies, as well as a better understanding of mechanisms linking toxicants with development of breast cancer, all reinforce the conclusion that exposures to these substances – many of which are found in common, everyday products and byproducts – may lead to increased risk of developing breast cancer.”