The Healthy Kitchen

Meg Hirshberg Profile Picture Meg Hirshberg

It’s fitting that the word “companion” derives from Latin and translates to “with bread,” meaning “one who breaks bread with another.” Sharing meals with others can add depth and a greater connection to our relationships—turning friends and family into true companions. Preparing meals for others is a beautiful way to express love and caring. This is the prime reason the kitchen is truly the heart of the home.

One interesting side effect of the current pandemic is that it’s become tough to find yeast and flour in our grocery stores. People are home, disoriented and anxious, many are out of work, and most restaurants are still closed. Baking bread and preparing nice meals have become a perfect way to find and give warmth and comfort.

More time preparing food means more time spent in the kitchen, which is why we decided to dedicate this newsletter to ways to create a healthy kitchen. It took me a while to figure out how to rid my kitchen of items contributing toxic chemicals to my food—principally plastics of all kinds, and nonstick pans. I always tell my adult kids (along with the appropriate dramatic hand gestures) to keep food over HERE and plastics over THERE—i.e., to keep the two apart as much as possible. I store food in glass containers and use glass or ceramic in the microwave. I drink from metal, ceramic, or glass. I don’t let cling wrap touch food. I’ve replaced my Teflon pans with stainless steel, cast iron, or ceramic (OK, except for the popover pans). With a few basic guidelines, you can greatly reduce your exposure to harmful chemicals that leach from items commonly used in today’s kitchens.

Preparing lovingly home-cooked food clear of harmful chemicals will nourish your “companions” in more ways than one.

Feel Empowered

Sign up for our newsletter to receive helpful tips on how to live an Anticancer lifestyle.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.