Resources

  • The 5 Mindset Keys

    Buddhist teachings offer a vivid image of the way most of our brains work.  Our common tendency to feel unsettled, distracted, restless, or confused is labeled “Monkey Mind”. To-do lists, regrets, and concerns can crowd our brain starting the moment our eyes open in the morning.

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  • Gratitude Practice Worksheet

    Writing down the things you’re grateful for is a great tool to help you begin to change your mindset. Instructions: 2-3 times a week, write down 3-5 things—these could be people, sensations, or experiences–for which you are grateful. Explain in detail why you are grateful for these things.

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  • Mindfulness Worksheet

    Take some time to reflect on what you have learned about Mindfulness. Instructions: Think about the many ways mindfulness can be a useful tool in improving your life. Use the space below to write down some thoughts or start a notebook.

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  • Instructions on How to Meditate

    Instructions on How to Meditate Reprinted from Waking Up, by Sam Harris Sit comfortably, with your spine erect, either in a chair or cross-legged on a cushion. Close your eyes, take a few deep breaths, and feel the points of contact between your body and the chair or the floor.

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  • Mindset Citations

    Antonovsky, A. (1979). Health, stress, and coping. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Bandura, A. (1993). Perceived Self-Efficacy in Cognitive Development and Functioning. Educational Psychologist,28(2), 117-148. doi:10.1207/s15326985ep2802_3 Black, D. S., O’Reilly, G. A., Olmstead, R., Breen, E. C.

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  • S.M.A.R.T. Planning for Change

    Now that you have reflected on your core values and some barriers to change, you are ready to start making a plan to change. Take a moment to refer back to your Anticancer Wheel of Life to identify which core value is most important to focus on right now.

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